In Memoriam: Sameer Moghrabi, Father of the Good

Abulkhair, father of the good. Image courtesy of the Syrian Civil Defense in Eastern Ghouta

Like any civil war, this one has divided the population and even shattered families. I’ve had relatives fighting on both sides of the conflict. Sometimes you’ll hear about siblings fighting on opposite sides. After years of division, it’s started to feel a lot more like ‘us’ versus ‘them’ — but who the “us” and “them” are can change from day to day. That explains how rebels in Eastern Ghouta can bombard Damascus, which today houses the majority of those who have fled Eastern Ghouta. It also explains the kind of retaliation on part of Damascus that sometimes doesn’t take into consideration that these people are still family.

Continue reading “In Memoriam: Sameer Moghrabi, Father of the Good”

The Thin Line between Us and the Enemey

“It’s hatred that threatens us all, not bombs or rockets. Tuesday’s Jerusalem attacks make this point very clearly. These attacks should be a wake-up call that no missile defense, gun control or counter-terrorism measures will protect us when hatred prevails. The thing about hatred is that you can’t overcome it by bombing your way out; that always backfires.”

Read the full article on the Daily Caller

Define Moderate

“Today it doesn’t matter what vision you have for the future or what your declared principles are. It’s not enough to include minorities and women within the ranks of your party, nor is it reassuring to claim that you believe in democracy. It’s certainly irrelevant how good your relationship with the West is. What truly counts now is how good you are at managing and containing this very destructive war.”

Read the full article on the Daily Caller

It’s All about Peas

In 2010, I introduced an idea to bring in positive change to our community by empowering free speech. Shortly after that, the “Arab Spring” began and no one seemed to be interested anymore in long-term reformist approaches. At some point, I myself gave up on my own principle and never really carried out with that project. I don’t know whether it’s still possible to put it into action after all that we’ve been through, but I think it should be at least available to those who might be interested. Continue reading “It’s All about Peas”

Damascus’ White Battles

When you live in a city where it snows for one or two days once a year; even sometimes once every few years, you can’t but be excited about it. I recall, often when it snowed, we played with that white stuff for one day before it would all melt down on the next day — if not by the end of the day. I still hold childhood memories of the times when I felt sad because I ran out of snow. Continue reading “Damascus’ White Battles”

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